The justification in medeas anger in medea a play by euripides

Here every year three playwrights competed against each other, each writing a tetralogy of three tragedies and a satyr play alongside Medea were PhiloctetesDictys and the satyr play Theristai. In the competition was among Euphorion the son of famed playwright AeschylusSophocles Euripides' main rival and Euripides.

The justification in medeas anger in medea a play by euripides

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Handout - Anger in Euripides' Medea | Gregory Sadler - ashio-midori.com

What did Jason do? Married Medea who bore him two sons. Married the Princess of Corinth. Banished Medea and her sons. Un-banished her sons because they can help him gain power in his new marriage. What did Medea do? Married Jason and bore him two sons. Did what she was supposed to do as a wife even forgiving him for his transgressions, prior to his new marriage.

Recognized the depths of Jason's greed, and the shallowness of his character. Set up the perfect revenge. Jason was a Jerkasaurus Maximus. He did whatever he felt like he needed to do, just to get ahead in the world.

The justification in medeas anger in medea a play by euripides

Medea played his own game with him and won. She killed the people that were going to give Jason all the power he wanted the king and princessand she did it by setting up Jason's own sons as the killers they delivered the poisoned giftswhich would meant that they were probably going to be killed by the police THEN, she upped him one more time, by killing the boys herself, making their deaths personal, knowing that the entire WORLD would assume that the boys were guilty of the assassination since they couldn't claim their innocenceand Jason was left with no power, no title, no sons, no princess-bride, and no wife to fall back on.

The boys were nothing more than pawns to Jason, so she treated them like pawns. Jason had himself set up for nothing but power, and she took away that power.

Jason was interested in nothing but his own reputation, which she destroyed by making him the father of assassins. She took it all from him - ALL of it. She was perfectly justified at least in HER mind.Euripides’s Medea revolves around the central passion of revenge towards her adversaries by the main protagonist, Medea as a result of her husband, Jason’s betrayal towards her by an engagement to the daughter of Creon, King of Corinth.

The chorus responds to her speech by commenting that the "fiercest anger" arises to fill the place of the "dearest love" (lines ).

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After pointing out that Medea's cleverness as a speaker will force him to respond with equally persuasive arguments, Jason denies his debt to her and claims that solely Aphrodite, the goddess of love, holds responsibility for his safe passage home from Colchis. Medea is then visited by Aegeus, the childless king of Athens, who asks the renowned sorceresss to help his wife conceive a child.

In return, Medea asks for his protection and, although Aegeus is not aware of Medea’s plans for revenge, he promises to give her refuge if she can escape to Athens. Related Questions. Discuss Medea's role as a tragic heroine in Euripides' play Medea. 3 educator answers Does it seem to you that Medea's rage in Medea by Euripides is justified by what has.

The justification in medeas anger in medea a play by euripides

Several points should be born in mind when reflecting on this aspect of the play. Remember that the Other is a complex and multifaceted concept: it comprises the foreign, the exotic, the unknown, the feared. Euripides emphasizes Medea's cunning and cleverness.

These traits, which should be admired, also cause suffering for Medea. The chorus responds to her speech by commenting that the "fiercest anger" arises to fill the place of the "dearest love" (lines ).

After pointing out that Medea's cleverness as a speaker will force him to respond with equally persuasive arguments, Jason denies his debt to her and claims that solely Aphrodite, the goddess of love, holds .

Medea Seminar by Julz Freiberg on Prezi