Coping with a terminal illness essay

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Coping with a terminal illness essay

When a Loved One is Terminally Ill: Talking About Death and Making End–of–life Decisions

You might not experience all of these feelings and, if you do, they will not necessarily come in any particular order. Whatever you feel, you do not have to go through it alone. Getting your diagnosis Hearing that your illness cannot be cured can be a frightening experience.

Many people will be unable to take everything in. If you are alone in the consultation, ask if you can bring a relative or friend in to hear everything the doctor has to say. This may involve asking for a follow-up appointment so that someone can be with you. Ask the doctor what support is available to you.

Coping with a terminal illness essay

They may refer you for additional specialist palliative care alongside the care you are already receiving. Your GP will also know of any local sources of support. Get in touch with your GP to explain what has happened and ask what help is available near you.

Talking About Death and Making End-of-Life Decisions

Find someone to talk to Not everyone wants to talk about what they are going through. However, a terminal sometimes called life-limiting diagnosis can bring up worries and fears, and it can help to talk about these so they don't start to feel impossible to deal with.

Friends, family and health professionals You might want to talk to your partner, family, or friends, or to a doctor, nurse, counsellor, or religious minister.

Coping with a terminal illness essay

People close to you will be dealing with their own feelings about your diagnosis. If you or they are finding it hard to talk about it, you might want to talk to someone less close to you, like a counsellor.

Your doctor or nurse can help you find one, or you can search for counselling services in your area. It can be useful to have someone to talk to at night time if you can't sleep. Make sure there's someone you can ring a friend, relative or the Samaritansbut also recognise that you don't have to lie in the dark and try to sleep.

You can turn on the light and do something else. Questions and worries about your future Knowing that you have a life-limiting condition leaves you living with uncertainty. You will probably have questions with no definite answers, such as: It is normal to feel like this, and it might be helpful to talk with others who are in a similar situation, and hear how they cope with these feelings.

Ask your doctor or nurse about local support groups for people who are living with a life-limiting illness, or for people who have the same condition as you. Many specialist charities offer support through local groups, email contact, phone lines and web forums.

For example, Marie Curie has an online community.View Essay - Module 6- short paper Coping with a Terminal ashio-midori.com from PSY at Southern New Hampshire University.

COPING WITH A TERMINAL ILLNESS 1 Coping with a Terminal Illness Nicole. Terminal cancer: how to live with dying What is it like to live with a terminal illness? Kate Granger, who was told her cancer was incurable a year ago, describes her battle to maintain a normal life.

Coping with a terminal illness - NHS

The coping with terminal illness is challenging for the patient because it is a traumatic event but also has a big impact on the patients’ family members and friends. Coping with a terminal illness is not unique to any particular culture.

How an individual reacts and prepares for their own inevitable show more content (Schapira, ) It is important for patients to have all the facts in order to accept and prepare for death.

Essay on Nursing Care Plan: Terminal Illness and End-of-Life Nursing Care Plan: Terminal Illness and End-of-Life Lisa White Western Governors University Community and Population Health SZT 2 September 07, Nursing Care Plan: Terminal Illness and End-of-Life Personal Perceptions Quality of life is an individual concept that is different for.

When a Loved One is Terminally Ill Talking About Death and Making End-of-Life Decisions. When a loved one develops a serious illness, it’s normal to go through an emotional experience akin to grieving.

Coping with a terminal illness - NHS